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Difference Between Microsoft Mail and Outlook (With Table) – Ask Any Difference.

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A fresh install of Windows 10 offers a number of software solutions, including one for email and calendar. Windows Mail is one-half of an email account and calendar offering — the other being Calendar — and is a lightweight app designed to handle multiple accounts and fairly moderate email use.

To those who have already used a version of Outlook in the past, the Windows Mail app will come across as a lightweight variant with some features omitted from the experience. The main difference between Outlook and the Mail app is the target audience.

The bundled app with Windows is meant to cater to consumers and those who check their emails on a daily basis. Outlook on-the-other-hand is for business and professionals who rely on email.

But just because the Windows Mail app is more basic than Outlook, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s a worse experience. The app itself is a solid client for email, and the accompanying calendar app will handle events, subscriptions to cloud-based calendars just fine. A neat feature of the Mail and Calendar apps is the design language, which fits in comfortably with Windows Various accounts can be added to Windows Mail, including Outlook.

Using Microsoft’s hosted email services like Outlook. Simply enter your account credentials, and the app will handle everything else.

Other service providers may require additional steps. Thanks to its free, basic feature set, the Windows Mail app has been designed and developed to take full advantage of touch support on tablets and laptops. It’s possible to utilize the on-screen keyboard and use the app to filter through messages and reply to contacts.

One issue I continue to experience, as well as other Mail app users, is the problem with mail synchronization. Attempting to synchronize all accounts can result in errors, which is not only irritating but requires troubleshooting. Contact integration from connected profiles isn’t perfect either, but again this is a more streamlined app and it’s possible to hit up contacts when creating or replying to emails. I also dislike the fact you need to switch between apps for mail and calendar appointments.

But it is free, so there’s that huge plus, and not everyone shares my view. Outlook is Microsoft’s premium email client and is regarded as one of the best in the business. There’s a good reason for this as the suite has been around for many years as part of Microsoft Office. The company has had time to invest in developing improvements to take the experience to the next level and increase productivity. While the Windows Mail app may just do the job for daily or weekly email checking, Outlook is for those who rely on email.

As well as the powerful email client, Microsoft has packed in calendar, contacts and task support. Simply switch between tabs and everything is loaded up. Office integration is also present, as one would expect from a more connected suite of productivity tools. Then there’s the Ribbon system that hides away the countless buttons and features that do pretty much everything one would require. Take a look at some of the feature discrepancies to see if there’s anything you require that cannot be done in the Windows Mail app:.

More information and comparison between the two apps can be found on Microsoft’s website opens in new tab. There are downsides to Microsoft’s more advanced email program. The first being the plethora of features that may never be used. Do you really need to categorize messages? That and the new Ribbon UI system that Microsoft has implemented into the new Office suite isn’t to everyone’s liking. It can also feel rather bloated when tasked to handle thousands upon thousands of emails from multiple accounts, but that’s a case of not effectively managing clutter.

And don’t get me started on some of the account setup issues. I’ve experienced the following a few times before it starts magically working for some reason. Outlook just can’t seem to connect and log in when initially setting up some accounts that require manual labor, asking you to re-enter credentials a few times before finally accepting defeat and connecting everything up. That said, it makes sense for Microsoft to offer more features in the Outlook suite to entice businesses and consumers to upgrade and pay the Office subscription, but if you don’t need many of the more advanced features the Mail app will do just fine.

Do you prefer the simplicity of Windows Mail and Calendar or are you a fan of the more feature-rich Outlook suite? Sound off in the comments! Updated on July 24, We updated this guide to take into account the latest releases of Outlook and Windows Mail and to make sure all information is up to date. He’s been involved in technology for more than a decade and knows a thing or two about the magic inside a PC chassis. You can follow him over on Twitter at RichEdmonds.

Windows Central Windows Central. Rich Edmonds. Topics Microsoft Outlook. See all comments Since when do you need an office sub for Outlook? Exactly , office is not needed for outlook. Outlook comes packaged with Office subscription, but you can buy Outlook version separately.

Exactly or buy the office suite without a subscription. Do not mind the writer. The Mail app can flag messages for follow-up, but it’s just decidedly more basic. With Outlook, you can set a follow-up time frame and receive a reminder later. Flagged email also shows up in your Outlook tasks. Also, when you mark the flag as complete, Outlook retains the status so you know you’ve taken action on the email.

The Mail app, on the other hand provided only a simple toggle. There’s no reminder and no check mark when it’s complete.

I do wish Microsoft would provide UWP versions of their core Office apps, including Outlook, that are more touch friendly and feature rich than the current batch of mobile apps. Should be an option in the future for flagged items to go into Cortana as a reminder.

A lot of people use flagging to send emails to the top of their inbox to keep them there and making them go into Cortana would be a lot of clutter for them. True, but flagging requires you to go into the mail app periodically to check on them. Cortana could keep bugging you, until you actually mark them as complete.

Or tasks could finally be added to the calendar app, these would sync to Mobile too I meant the emails when I used the word “them. The most wasted features in Enterprise that would make everyone’s life easier is the due to the lack of knowledge and subset of features.

This allows me to visually see what emails I’ve missed or scrolled through – Reminders e-mails or tasks with deadlines? Add a reminder for when to bring it up again. Sometimes I use reminders to ping people who are out of vacation and need to follow up on their return – Search Folders See only emails that have been flagged, or unread – Quick Actions I have set my inbox to not mark anything as read unless i choose too.

Rules are another function that most people don’t like using becasue setting them up are cumbersome. Personally i prefer to use rules on emails that are automated. They tend to have a specific subject line or subject format, and an email they come from.

This way if you want to sort it into specific folders, flag, mark as complete or delete – allowing me to focus and sift through unclaimed or unknown emails this system can’t be applied. I really can’t see my self using any other email client professionally.

Personal use – is another story since I don’t have such a time sensitive need and most of the time I spend is deleting emails I find little interest in or reviewing transactions.

I actually would love for companies to approach e-mail differently. If i have these contacts on my address book – they should never go to spam, the client should mark them as VIP from the start in comparison to other emails.

If I Starred it, then it would possibly make that email more visible and give it a positive cost. I use most of those features all week I am not sure I could live with out them, I use them so much!

True, they dont say much about these featues but, one you know how to use them, OUtlook client is the ONLY option, it really is that much better. The article calls Outlook an email client, but it actually is a groupware client – for Exchange. That’s why it offers so much more functionality compared to the very basic mail app, when you are really trying to work with it.

You need to connect to the right service of course. It is also working with online services that make use the Exchange ActiveSync protocol. Names are a bit confusing – like Outlook the original Office desktop application , Outlook Mail and Calendar as the apps from the article are called on Mobile and Outlook. Btw: Outlook the Office application is very usable on the touch screen of my SP3.

Outlook can be used as you said in a groupware or corporate but, it can be used for almost any user with any type of email. It is a VERY powerfull client that can be trimmed down to be nice and easy.

Yes, that’s basically what I wrote and what is not mentioned in the article. Just take care that features are limited with the wrong protocol, e. Outloom is usable but I think I prefer mail when I am in tablet mode. Been using since Outlook 98 when I ditched Outlook Express. Live Mail in Windows 7 days was the best free mail client and MS scrapped it in favor of the new Windows 8 mail client, but that didn’t help people still on Windows 7.

Outlook could use a better Live tile, and an official tile just for the calendar. What do you mean, better live tile? It’s not live now. Having a separate calendar that isn’t live either doesn’t seem useful.

 
 

Mail and outlook: Which email application is right for you on Windows 10?

 

You might wonder which Outlook app to use for your daily tasks, such as sending email, scheduling, and managing your tasks and contacts. Each app offers a consistent user experience to help you be productive, but they serve different purposes.

This article helps you decide when to use Outlook, Outlook on the web, or the Mail and Calendar apps on a mobile device. Accessible from most browsers at Microsoft portal. Outlook is our most full-featured email and calendar app, optimized for PCs and laptops.

If you’re a heavy email and calendar user, and you want all the advanced features and capabilities of email, such as scheduling and task management, rich formatting, or mailbox rules, Outlook is the best choice for you.

You can use Outlook with your Microsoft account for business or with other accounts, such as Outlook. For quick access to your email, calendar, and contacts on any computer with an Internet connection, sign in to your organization’s Microsoft mailbox.

Mail and Calendar apps provide basic email and calendaring features at home or work, best suited for your mobile devices. These apps are touch-friendly and mobile optimized for simplified user experience, so no need for a keyboard or mouse. You can use and customize the swipe gestures to take actions like delete, flag, move, and so on. The Mail and Calendar apps can be set up with your Microsoft account, Outlook.

Set up email on an Android phone or tablet. Set up email on iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch. When you write or reply to an email, you can find all the people that you’ve exchanged emails with in the To line. Simply start typing a name to see the suggestions, or select Search directory at the bottom of the suggested names.

Need more help? Expand your skills. Get new features first. Was this information helpful? Yes No. Thank you! Any more feedback? The more you tell us the more we can help. Can you help us improve? Resolved my issue. Clear instructions. Easy to follow. No jargon. Pictures helped. Didn’t match my screen.

Incorrect instructions. Too technical. Not enough information. Not enough pictures. Any additional feedback? Submit feedback.

Thank you for your feedback! Outlook on the web. Mail and Calendar. Outlook for PC. Outlook for iOS. Outlook for Android. Microsoft Exchange Online.

 

Windows 10 mail vs outlook free

 
Outlook lets you focus on what’s important with a clear view of email, calendars, and contacts. Dec 15,  · Apps are available for Windows 10, macOS, iOS, and Android, and you can give it a shot for free for a personal account, with Pro accounts starting at $6 per month. Check Amazon (opens in new tab. May 17,  · Windows Mail is the free app bundled with the OS that is ideal for those who use email sparingly, but Outlook is the solution for anyone who’s serious about electronic messaging. (opens in new tab Estimated Reading Time: 6 mins.

 
 

Microsoft Mail vs. Outlook: Which Windows 10 Email App Is Right for You?.

 
 
For you and other users, perhaps the most critical difference between Mail and Outlook will be the cost. Mail is entirely free on all versions of Windows Windows Mail may be the best email client for you, rather than paying for Microsoft Outlook. Here’s why.